Archive for the ‘kids’ Category

learning events @ AMNH

October 16, 2008

Some great opportunities to learn more about the world that’s changing around us are coming up at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), in conjunction with the new Climate Change exhibit.



Future events @ AMNH

The museum plans to host several programs related to the exhibit including:

  • International Polar Weekend celebration (February 7-8, 2009)
  • World Water Day celebration (March 21, 2009)
  • A series of interactive exhibits introducing kids ages 9-12 to the science of climate change and possible solutions to global warming
  • A series of panel discussions bringing together world experts to discuss and debate the implications of climate change for our future (starting in January)
  • Additional programs focusing on the effects of global warming on the wine and coffee industries


Upcoming programs for adults

These selected programs examine both personal and industrial responsibilities regarding sustainability.

FutureFashion: Connecting an Industry to Sustainable Practices
Thursday, October 23, 6:30pm
$15 ($13.50 Members)

Industry experts, Julie Gilhart, Fashion Director of Barneys; Scott Hahn, President of Loomstate; and others, participate in a discussion with Leslie Hoffman, executive director, Earth Pledge, and Greg Loosvelt, Earth Pledge’s carbon footprint assessment expert, about ways the fashion industry is working to reduce its environmental footprint. Learn about Earth Pledge’s FutureFashion initiative, which encourages sustainability by working within the fashion industry to promote renewable, reusable, and nonpolluting materials and processes. On exhibit will be one-of-a-kind creations made as part of this collaboration by a few top designers, including Stella McCartney, Calvin Klein, and Rodarte.

Global Kitchen: Wine and Climate Change
Tuesday, October 28, 6:30 pm
$20

What consequences will global warming have on the wine industry? In this discussion and wine tasting, climatologist Gregory V. Jones, Southern Oregon University; author and blogger Tyler Colman, DrVino.com and Wine Politics; and Evan Spingarn, wine importer and distributor, will address such topics as redrawing the wine map, wines and their cultural identities, and calculating wine’s carbon footprint.

Margaret Mead Film & Video Festival
Friday-Saturday, November 14-16
$10 ($9 Members)

This sidebar to the international documentary film festival will include two sessions on climate change and global culture. Post-screening discussions with filmmakers and specialists will follow these films. Selected works will circulate in the Traveling Film Series domestically and internationally.

Peace with Seals
Saturday, November 15
Directed by Miloslav Novak. Peace with Seals (Mir s Tuleni) tells the story of biologist Emanuele Coppola’s hunt for the Mediterranean monk seal. Conversations with marine biologists and philosophers, as well as the beachgoers on the Mediterranean shores, who have supplanted the seals, lead him to believe that the only monk seals left are those preserved in Coppola’s extensive collection of archival footage. (U.S. Premiere)

Recipes for Disaster
Sunday, November 16
Directed by John Webster. Recipes for Disaster features the filmmaker and his family in a quest to reduce their carbon footprints by going one year without using oil-based byproducts. Their goal of “green living” seems manageable at first, but surviving without everyday essentials, like goods packaged in plastic, becomes increasingly challenging. (U.S. Premiere)

March Point
Sunday, November 16
Filmmaker and producer in person
Directed by Annie Silverstein. Intent on finding solutions to the pollution caused by two oil refineries in their native land, three teenage members of the Swinomish Tribe arm themselves with cameras and travel across the country to meet the politicians who can help. Following the screening will be a discussion with the filmmaker and producer. (NY premiere)
Co-presenter: National Museum of the American Indian

Upcoming programs for kids and families

Adventures In Science: Climate Change Sundays
11 am–12:30 pm
(for 4th and 5th graders)
1:30–3 pm
(for 6th and 7th graders)
$30 each; $75 for all three

In conjunction with our new exhibition, these hands-on workshops introduce young audiences to the science of climate change and potential solutions. Participate in all three sessions and earn a certificate.

What Is the Difference Between Climate and Weather?
AS101908
Sunday, October 19

When people ask about the weather, we know what they mean: is it sunny, rainy, or hot? But what does climate mean, and how is it different from weather? In this workshop, we’ll use fun activities to compare their differences and similarities and learn why climate is so important.

What Is Climate Change?
AS102608
Sunday, October 26

Is Earth really getting hotter? Will a polar bear one day be your neighbor? Using the new exhibition Climate Change: The Threat to Life and A New Energy Future, we will examine the elements of climate change, its impact on Earth, and what that means for animals like polar bears, penguins—and us!

What Can We Do about Climate Change?
AS110208
Sunday, November 2

We know that Earth’s climate is changing—but what can you do about it? Is recycling enough? What exactly are greenhouse gases? Discover just how much energy you use in your daily life, and learn ways you can reduce your personal impact on the planet and help others to do the same.

To register for these programs, call 212-769-5200 or visit www.amnh.org.

eco etsy finds

September 23, 2008

One of the great things about Etsy, crafty online marketplace, is that you get to deal directly with the artists who craft their wares. Many one-of-a-kind or limited edition items — arts, crafts, jewelry, apparel, letterpress, even food — are waiting to find a good home. You can also choose to buy locally, from artisans in your area.

Here’s a little roundup of some of the eco-friendly goods available on Etsy.

Dollparts and Candy
Remade, Japanese-inspired clothing — if you get one of their special garments, you can probably guarantee that you won’t see anyone else wearing it.

Go West Prairie Cowgirl Shirt
$22

Superscoop Icecream Denim Skirt
$28

Toggle
Cool chain knit necklaces made from New Zealand wool (so it does have to travel all the way from Auckland, if you’re not in that neck of the woods) are a more eco-friendly alternative to metal chains. As Esther and Shelley of Toggle say: Enjoy some gilt without the guilt!

Soft Rocks Woollen Chain in Black with Jewels
$78


Soft Rocks Woollen Chunky Chain in Deep Purple
$58

Soft Rocks Chunky Chain in Silver
$40

Greenstarstudio
Danamarie Hosler is known for her knitimals, unique creatures made from various textiles — wool, yarn, felt, &c. But I especially like these felt masks, just in time for Halloween (of course the kids will want to wear them all-year round… I see plenty of little boys dressed up like Batman in the middle of the summer around here).

The masks are hand-stitched, adorable, and you can get one for your favorite little monster for only $12 each. (They fit most adults, too!)

Red bird knitimal mask
$12

Blue and yellow knitimal mask
$12

VKnO
One of VKnO’s specialties is her Windows of the Past – Pop Art Pendants.” As she puts it in her profile: A unique and eye catching piece of art for you neck. The one-of-a-kind pendants are made from recycled aluminum cans and vintage magazine or newspaper clippings. Pretty clever stuff.

Just like the sun
$14.50


Who said it’s a dog’s life

$14.50

Map Greenwich London (of course I love this one, it’s a map!)
$14.50

naturaleza al descubierto
The gorgeous natural wood and plant materials in the jewelry by Marlon and Amy Solano are sustainably collected in Nicaragua. They accept custom orders, so if you’re looking for a unique gift or wedding ring, naturaleza’s beautiful jewelry could be for you.

La Malinche
organic seed earrings
$20

Asi
nambaro wood ring with sterling silver inlay and band
$82



Ojo
coyol ring with tagua and jadeita inlay
$86

world of good (shopping)

September 8, 2008

When I spend my hard-earned dough I’d like to know where it’s going. Who is it benefiting (or harming)? What kinds of resources were used? Is it really worth the price (in terms of labor, effort, materials, etc)?

So in recent years, I’ve become really selective about where I shop. As I’ve said before, I avoid the big box and big name retailers (whenever possible) in favor of local, indie biz. Think Etsy vs Banana Republic, eBay vs Crate and Barrel. Of course there are times when it’s really difficult to completely ignore the big boys, like when you need a paper towel holder or new toilet seat.

Thankfully it’s getting easier and easier to find alternative sources for goods. Like the new responsible marketplace by eBay, World of Good. They’ve got a pretty big range of fair trade and/or eco-friendly stuff, from clothing and jewelry to furniture and toys. What’s really great is that they break it down in terms of the impact your purchase has. They call this a Goodprint and these are the categories: people positive, eco positive, animal friendly, and supports a cause.

It’s feel-good shopping, certified by third parties with their Trustology verification system. Many of their verifiers and sellers have been in the fair trade game for years, including Co-op America and Ten Thousand Villages.

Here’s a random selection of fun things you can get from World of Good:

PeaceKeeper Nail Polish
Proceeds go to people positive charities

Telephone Wire Bracelet
Eco-friendly repurposed wire, benefits South African artisans

Baby Llama Toy
Benefits Peruvian artisans, made with energy conservation in mind

Where does your hard-earned dough go?

hittin’ the books

August 26, 2008

If you’re a parent, you’re probably celebrating. A student, mourning the unofficial end of summer. It’s that time of year — Back to School. And just like other marketed “seasons,” there’s something to buy. School supplies, accessories, clothes, etc.

But instead of the conventional stuff that was available to me when I was a kid, there’s a whole range of eco-friendly options for back to school.

At the The Green Office, they make it easy to get back-to-school supplies with kits for both students and teachers. For example, for kids in 3rd to 5th grade, for $24.99 a kit would include:

  • 3 Repocket Recycled Pocket Folders
  • 1 Envirotech™ 100% Recycled Wirebound Notebook
  • 1 Earth Write® Pencil (12-pack), Made in USA from recycled newspaper
  • 1 Classic Colors Washable Waterbased (non-toxic) Markers
  • 1 Crayola Classic Colors Crayons, 16/box (non-toxic)
  • 1 Triggerwood Pen (plus refill)
  • 1 Foohy® Colored Pencils (non-toxic)
  • 1 Professional Watercolor Set with Brush, 8 Assorted Colors, Half Pans
  • 1 KleenEarth® Steel Children’s Safety Scissors
  • 1 Washable, Nontoxic, Removable, Restickable Glue Stick
  • 1 Pack of 7th Generation Facial Tissues

They also sell individual products, from recycled paper notebooks and printing paper to refillable pens and recycled content pencils.

Buy Green also has a range of eco-friendly office and back-to-school supplies.

Like this cool set of recycled newspaper pencils ($6.62 by O’BON)


Or this elephant dung paper notebook (that’s right! It’s by Ellie Poo, $9)

And this classic composition notebook of recycled paper ($2.79 by New Leaf)

Also…
Check out the back-to-school giveaway at Sustainable Is Good.
They’re giving away 2 bags from act2 GreenSmart that are made from 100% recycled PET plastic bottles. Note: You must be a student to enter. Entry deadline: September 2, 2008. Check out their site for details.

for the babes

August 12, 2008

Organic cotton — grown without toxic pesticides and fertilizers — is ideal for babies’ sensitive skin. And there are so many options available now in clothing and bedding, there’s no need to settle for conventional cotton.

cute onesies

Happy Print Body Suit by Positively Organic ($19)
Great prints in a rainbow of colors, made with environmentally friendly inks and dyes

adorable accessories

Navy Stripes Cap and Booties by Sckoon ($13 each)

toys and teething

Bear Blanket Toy, Organic Veggie Set, and Bumble Bee Teething Ring by Under the Nile ($12.47, $23.95, and $7.40, respectively)

Happy Lion and Navy Stripe Bear by Sckoon ($14 and $12, respectively)
They’re even stuffed with organic cotton, too!



bedding
No Compromise Crib Mattress by Naturepedic ($259)
100% polyethylene and US-grown organic cotton — no PVC, phthalates, biocides, foam, or latex; Made in USA

Fitted Crib Sheet, Crib Blanket/Play Mat, and Swaddle Blankets by Under the Nile ($21.98, $30.36, and $25.90, respectively)
Fair trade, organic Egyptian cotto
n; made with low-impact dyes

Nature’s Purest Sleepy Safari Pillow and 4-piece Crib Set and Receiving Blanket by Summer Infant ($22.99, $194.63, and $27.99 respectively)
Cute elephant pillow and crib set made from organically grown, naturally dyed cotton

for the baby bum

Breathable Diaper Cover or Cloth Diaper by Sckoon ($24 and $14.90, respectively)

Organic Cotton Baby Wipes by Natracare
Free from harsh detergents, petroleum, sodium laureth/laurel sulfate, parabens, etc. so you can be sure your baby’s tush is not awash in toxins