Archive for the ‘shopping’ Category

byob @ kaight

October 30, 2008

A discount — what better incentive for bringing your own bag? (Well, aside from knowing you’re not creating waste.) If you BYO bag to eco-fashion store Kaight, you’ll get 10% off any purchase in the store. Love it!

Dear Friends,

In these times, even the smallest things can make a big difference. For instance, being wasteful simply isn’t good: not for our wallets and certainly not for our environment. So, going forward, refuse a bag with your next purchase at Kaight, and we’ll give you 10% off, no matter how tiny or large the purchase.

We’ve got some incredible scarves, mittens, coats, shoes — the list could do on forever — in stock. So grab one of the gazillion totes you’ve got lying around and receive 10% off your next, and then your next, and your next (see where we’re going with this?) purchase.

See you soon!

Sincerely,

kate mcgregor
kaight inc.

Kaight
83 Orchard Street
New York, New York 10002
212-680-5630
http://www.kaightnyc.com

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how to live sustainably in nyc: part 1

October 29, 2008

A class I recently attended at Borough of Manhattan Community College helps New Yorkers find simple ways to live more sustainably. Led by Les Judd of Green Boroughs, the class consisted of an initial classroom session, two walking tours, and finally a panel discussion with green business leaders.

The basics
In class 1 we talked about the basic steps to living sustainably, including shopping at the farmer’s market and community supported agriculture (CSA), plus reducing meat in our diets as ways to reduce our carbon footprint.

I learned a little something about recycling in this city — just because the plastic has a #1 on the bottom doesn’t necessarily mean it is recyclable. City recycling only processes plastic bottles with a #1; this excludes iced coffee cups, salad takeout containers, and the like.

We also discussed switching to alternative energy resources such as wind power through ConEdison Solutions.

The walking tours
Les took us to some great businesses in downtown Manhattan. We went to both the East and West Village locations of Birdbath Bakery and shops such as Sustainable NYC, Moo Shoes, and Organic Avenue. We also walked through community gardens like Toyota Children’s Garden, one of the green spaces saved by New York Restoration Project which was founded by Bette Midler.

Look for parts 2 and 3 of how to live sustainably where I highlight the green business panelists, including the CEO and founder of Green Apple Cleaners and the Executive Director of Sustainable South Bronx.

eco skivvies

October 28, 2008

What do you hold closest to your nearest and dearest parts? How about pesticides or polluting synthetic materials? Next time you’re in the market for unmentionables, make the switch to pure organic cotton, bamboo, recycled polyester, or eco-friendly silk instead.

For the Guys

Boxers or briefs from Patagonia
($25 – $32)
(organic cotton or recycled polyester)

Hemp boxers at BuyGreen.com ($24)

Boxer briefs by Red Dog Sportswear ($50 for 3)
(organic cotton)

For the Gals

Bras and undies from Patagonia
($20 – $50)
(recycled polyester)

Perfectly Imperfect undies at The Greenloop (sale $15)
(organic cotton and lace)

Louella Bloom boyshorts ($22)
(soy & organic cotton, made in USA)

AngelRox wing brief ($30)
(organic cotton, made in USA)

Bra and pantie set by On the Inside ($58)
(organic cotton, sourced and made in USA)

Bra & pantie set by On the Inside ($70)
(organic cotton, sourced and made in USA)

tomorrow at brooklyn indie market

October 24, 2008

I won’t be able to make it, but maybe you can go and support some local artisans tomorrow from 11am to 7pm at the Brooklyn Indie Market (Smith & Union, Carroll Gardens).

The theme tomorrow is Steampunk, which according to wiki editors at Wikipedia is a “subgenre of fantasy and speculative fiction that came into prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s.” Think Victorian England mixed with sci-fi fantasy (Jules Verne, HG Wells).

Two designers of note:

  • Sylvia Holden whose deconstructed fashion is made from recycled materials
  • Wren of Purevile whose often macabre one-of-a-kind jewelry is fashioned from antiques and such (like bones and doll parts)

Looks like I’ll be missing out!

[via Brooklyn Based]

nau is back!

October 21, 2008

Eco-activewear makers Nau are back! Check out some of their new designs (see Flection Wrap Skirt and Men’s Riding Jacket below), as well as some of their classics, like the Urbane Jacket (for women, last pictured below).



Related post
welcome back, nau!

support fair trade to help end poverty

October 15, 2008

Another way to help people in impoverished places is to support fair trade practices.

According to the Fair Trade Federation:

Fair trade is a system of exchange that seeks to create greater equity and partnership in the international trading system by

  • Providing fair wages in the local context,
  • Supporting safe, healthy, and participatory workplaces,
  • Supplying financial and technical support to build capacity,
  • Promoting environmental sustainability,
  • Respecting cultural identity,
  • Offering public accountability and transparency,
  • Building direct and long-term relationships, and
  • Educating consumers.

FTF members foster partnerships with producers, because they know these connections are a highly effective way to help producers help themselves. Fair trade is not about charity. It is a holistic approach to trade and development that aims to alter the ways in which commerce is conducted, so that trade can empower the poorest of the poor. Fair Trade Organizations seek to create sustainable and positive change in developing and developed countries.

October happens to be Fair Trade Month (of course, we should support it year round!). You can purchase fair trade certified goods at the following shops:

save on eco-fashion at the greenloop

October 8, 2008

Save up to 60% on great sustainable threads at Greenloop — eco-friendly clothing for men and women from big name designers like Edun, Linda Loudermilk, Loomstate, and Stewart+Brown. The sale starts today and ends Sunday 10/12.

kaight loves fall — sale!

October 6, 2008

Save on some great eco-friendly fashion for Fall.

Visit www.kaightshop.com and enter coupon code “fall” at checkout to receive 25% off your purchase. Valid through Oct. 15.

eco etsy finds

September 23, 2008

One of the great things about Etsy, crafty online marketplace, is that you get to deal directly with the artists who craft their wares. Many one-of-a-kind or limited edition items — arts, crafts, jewelry, apparel, letterpress, even food — are waiting to find a good home. You can also choose to buy locally, from artisans in your area.

Here’s a little roundup of some of the eco-friendly goods available on Etsy.

Dollparts and Candy
Remade, Japanese-inspired clothing — if you get one of their special garments, you can probably guarantee that you won’t see anyone else wearing it.

Go West Prairie Cowgirl Shirt
$22

Superscoop Icecream Denim Skirt
$28

Toggle
Cool chain knit necklaces made from New Zealand wool (so it does have to travel all the way from Auckland, if you’re not in that neck of the woods) are a more eco-friendly alternative to metal chains. As Esther and Shelley of Toggle say: Enjoy some gilt without the guilt!

Soft Rocks Woollen Chain in Black with Jewels
$78


Soft Rocks Woollen Chunky Chain in Deep Purple
$58

Soft Rocks Chunky Chain in Silver
$40

Greenstarstudio
Danamarie Hosler is known for her knitimals, unique creatures made from various textiles — wool, yarn, felt, &c. But I especially like these felt masks, just in time for Halloween (of course the kids will want to wear them all-year round… I see plenty of little boys dressed up like Batman in the middle of the summer around here).

The masks are hand-stitched, adorable, and you can get one for your favorite little monster for only $12 each. (They fit most adults, too!)

Red bird knitimal mask
$12

Blue and yellow knitimal mask
$12

VKnO
One of VKnO’s specialties is her Windows of the Past – Pop Art Pendants.” As she puts it in her profile: A unique and eye catching piece of art for you neck. The one-of-a-kind pendants are made from recycled aluminum cans and vintage magazine or newspaper clippings. Pretty clever stuff.

Just like the sun
$14.50


Who said it’s a dog’s life

$14.50

Map Greenwich London (of course I love this one, it’s a map!)
$14.50

naturaleza al descubierto
The gorgeous natural wood and plant materials in the jewelry by Marlon and Amy Solano are sustainably collected in Nicaragua. They accept custom orders, so if you’re looking for a unique gift or wedding ring, naturaleza’s beautiful jewelry could be for you.

La Malinche
organic seed earrings
$20

Asi
nambaro wood ring with sterling silver inlay and band
$82



Ojo
coyol ring with tagua and jadeita inlay
$86

world of good (shopping)

September 8, 2008

When I spend my hard-earned dough I’d like to know where it’s going. Who is it benefiting (or harming)? What kinds of resources were used? Is it really worth the price (in terms of labor, effort, materials, etc)?

So in recent years, I’ve become really selective about where I shop. As I’ve said before, I avoid the big box and big name retailers (whenever possible) in favor of local, indie biz. Think Etsy vs Banana Republic, eBay vs Crate and Barrel. Of course there are times when it’s really difficult to completely ignore the big boys, like when you need a paper towel holder or new toilet seat.

Thankfully it’s getting easier and easier to find alternative sources for goods. Like the new responsible marketplace by eBay, World of Good. They’ve got a pretty big range of fair trade and/or eco-friendly stuff, from clothing and jewelry to furniture and toys. What’s really great is that they break it down in terms of the impact your purchase has. They call this a Goodprint and these are the categories: people positive, eco positive, animal friendly, and supports a cause.

It’s feel-good shopping, certified by third parties with their Trustology verification system. Many of their verifiers and sellers have been in the fair trade game for years, including Co-op America and Ten Thousand Villages.

Here’s a random selection of fun things you can get from World of Good:

PeaceKeeper Nail Polish
Proceeds go to people positive charities

Telephone Wire Bracelet
Eco-friendly repurposed wire, benefits South African artisans

Baby Llama Toy
Benefits Peruvian artisans, made with energy conservation in mind

Where does your hard-earned dough go?