Posts Tagged ‘nyc’

this saturday: brooklyn homesteader’s backyard homesteading bootcamp

April 2, 2012

With Spring now upon us, the time is ripe to dig in and start growing! Learn how to veggie garden, keep chickens & bees, homebrew, and so much more this Saturday with Meg Paska of Brooklyn Honey & Brooklyn Homesteader. I’ll be leading an afternoon session on making your own body care goods and cleaning solutions (including laundry soap!).

Come on out and get dirty, and then get clean!

Brooklyn Homesteader’s Backyard Homesteading Bootcamp (Spring 2012)

Saturday, April 7, 2012 from 9 AM to 5 PM

Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Sign up on EventBrite

Ever wanted to learn how to grow, make and preserve your own food in a small space but need some hands-on guidance to do so?

Join Meg Paska, the “Brooklyn Homesteader“, on her own turf as she teaches you how to raise chickens, keep bees, grow a garden, compost, forage, can, pickle, preserve and homebrew all from her tiny Greenpoint homestead.

Coffee and homemade donuts will be served in the morning before the class commences.

It will tentatively go as follows:

-Building Raised Beds and Planning a Vegetable Garden

-Composting

-Chickens 101

-Food Preservation (Freezing, Drying, Canning, Fermentation)

LUNCH!

-Beekeeping 101

-Wild Edibles

-Homebrewing basics

-DIY Home and Body Care

WIND DOWN with local beers and Q&A

Attendees will get hands on experience in all aspects of the above mentioned topics and will leave with care packages of assorted goodies! (Books on the subjects covered, seeds, canned and pickled items from the class, etc)

Please email Megan@BrooklynHomesteader.com with any questions.

Students are expected to bring notepads and pens, dress in light color clothes, be able to climb ladders and are willing to sign a waiver, as we will be getting up close and personal with stinging, venomous insects, boiling hot jars of food and eating weeds from the nearby park.

All other materials are included in the cost of the class.

Sign up here!

Meg Paska is a writer, Huffington Post blogger and instructor at such fine institutions as The New York Botanical Gardens and Third Ward. She currently manages apiaries for hospitality groups and farms in the NY area and has a book on Urban Beekeeping due out on Chronicle Books in early 2013.

festival of ideas for the new city, streetfest – may 7

April 20, 2011

Do we need a new city? Is there something wrong with our old city? Sure, there are a lot of things going right in this big urban place we live in – a vast public transportation network, small & densely packed dwellings (saving on energy & other resources), new & improved bike lanes & pedestrian areas, great parks. But there is still a lot of room for improvement. “What?” you may ask. Come to the Festival of Ideas for the New City to find out what the true visionaries are already doing & planning to pave the way to an even better city.

MOS Collective at the Festival

Come for the StreetFest on May 7th to visit an incredible array of organizations & individuals reshaping the city. I’ll be there with the MOS Collective, doing free demos & selling my body care & cleaning solutions. And I’m breaking out my personal care product body map for the occasion (see below). My pals, DeeDee & Marga, also of said Collective, will be creating personalized maps, highlighting your favorite sustainable resources throughout the city. Shig & Annie will be singing the praises of compost (Annie might also be selling her book, Gastropolis).

Check out this cool interactive map to find where we’ll be on the day. We’ll be there from 11am to 7pm.

My friend Kate Payne will also be there promoting her awesome new book, The Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking.

Here are some of the other amazing folks who’ll be there…

Brooklyn Flea Food Vendors

Brooklyn Grange Farm

Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP)

Eagle Street Rooftop Farm & Growing Chefs

Eyebeam

Etsy

Farm City

Fine & Raw Chocolate

Green My Bodega & Foodshed Market

GreenHome NYC

GrowNYC

Hot Bread Kitchen

Lower East Side Ecology Center

and so many more!

It is guaranteed to be an inspiring time.

urban permaculture opportunities

June 16, 2010

I am heartened at the increasing number of offerings and growing interest in permaculture design courses in the city. It tells me that more and more people are becoming mindful of our connection to the earth and the great impact we can have – positive or negative – on it. Some friends new to the method have been asking where they could study the triple-bottom-line principles of permaculture. I always respond, it’s not really a matter of where you study, but who you study with. Who we learn from and the context in which we learn should reflect how and where we practice permaculture. While I’d love to go to the country to study, the skills I learn may not apply to the urban setting in which I live and will practice. As the saying often used in permie circles goes, “it depends.”

If you or someone you know is interested in an urban permaculture design certification (PDC), check out these offerings in the city this summer, listed by teacher.

Andrew Faust

Andrew puts the state of the world into perspective by focusing on its evolutionary history and the leverage points that matter – reducing our personal and environmental exposure to toxins, cultivating more diverse & beneficial heirloom plants & heritage breed animals, and building strong communities. (NB: I have a bias, I did take Andrew’s PDC!)

Classes begin: August 14 (11 sessions, Saturdays & Sundays through October)

Cost: $1000 (due to the hard economic times, he’s extending the early bird discount to all attendees)

More info and registration

Ariane Burgess

According to the Open Center class description: Ariane “teaches Gaia Education’s Design for Sustainability courses in Findhorn, Scotland, and Thailand. Her research focuses on best practices for transitioning human settlements into resilient and regenerative ones. She is the founder of Regenerative Culture, which is dedicated to the education and design of regenerative communities.”

Classes begin: July 17 (12 sessions, Saturdays & Sundays through October)

Cost: $1225, unless you’re an Open Center member, in which case it’s $1180. (Payment plan is available.)

More info and registration

Claudia Joseph

If you want to get your hands dirty learning DIY skills in a historic setting from a woman who has been involved in agricultural and ecological education since the 90s, take this class.

Classes begin: July 17 (12 sessions, Saturdays & Sundays)

Cost: $1,150  5% discount before July 1
Scholarships & work-trade available on a limited basis by application process

More info and registration

queens gets its first food co-op

April 19, 2010

When you’re living near THE infamous food co-op in Brooklyn (you know the one) and around the corner from one of the best farmers markets in town, and new CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture outfits) are popping up all around, it’s easy to forget that some boroughs are less fortunate when it comes to having access to local farm-fresh food.

One such borough, Queens, is about to get their due. The Queens Harvest Co-op in Sunnyside is about to break through the great food for a great price barrier that (most of) Queens has been experiencing. Their plan is to open in the Fall of 2011 (I know, a long time to wait – but you know it’ll be worth it!), and if you want to learn more about their plans, check out the Queens Green Drinks event next Monday, April 26th. Details below:

Monday, April 26th
6:30 to 9pm

Claret
4602 Skillman Ave
Sunnyside, Queens

Queens Green Drinks
Hosted by Queens Harvest Food Co-op in Sunnyside!

The Queens Harvest Food Co-op is a new community driven venture into the world of fresh, high-quality food at affordable prices. They will be a member-owned and controlled market that puts community before profits. Anticipated opening in the Queens Plaza area in 2011. Please come and meet the members of the Queens Harvest Food Co-op on April 26th at Claret and/or go to www.queensharvestcoop.com for more information!

Learn more about this meetup on Facebook.

recreating wilderness with reclaimed materials

March 22, 2010

This past weekend, I participated in Urban Wilderness Action Day, part of Eyebeam’s ElectroSmog Festival. My friend Kris & her hubby Pascal put together this little video recapping my role in the day.

Check out some photos of the murals & other forest elements I put together with reclaimed materials and heaps o’ help from some good friends. Birds & abstract fragment

Big hugs and thank yous to everyone who helped (Eric, DeeDee, Marga, Kris, Ian, Lauren) and made it possible (Stephanie & the Eyebeam crew, Materials for the Arts).

urban wilderness action day – this saturday!

March 15, 2010

It’s been quiet on this little blog for the last couple of weeks. I’ve been hard at work on a project. An urban wilderness intervention project to be exact. It all goes down this Saturday, March 20, at 1pm at Eyebeam (540 W 21st St). And I won’t be the only one staging a public intervention. Curious? Come check it out! Details below:

You are invited to join the Urban Wilderness Action Center for a day of action where people from NYC, Berlin, Amsterdam and London will design and disseminate projects around the theme of “urban wilderness.”
UWAC DAY is Saturday, March 20. Each of four lead cities will host a day of free artist-led interventions that respond to urban wilderness. We will document the day through a live Twitter, Flickr, and video feed streamed through the UWAC website.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Live video chat with all four sites: 3PM EST
Ongoing live Twitter feed from each project site at #UWAClive

1–6PM EST, NYC:
Join us at Eyebeam for a series of FREE and open to the public events:

  • Eyebeam Student Residents Caroline Spivack, Jade Highleyman, Luther Cherry, Spencer Brown, and Zoe Penina Baker are working with artists Doris Cacoilo and Sonali Sridhar and gardener / window farmer Maya Nayak to workshop a guerrilla gardening andventure. Participants on UWAC Day will craft and distribute their own plant-based urban intervention.
  • Tattfoo Tan (artist) will be onsite at Eyebeam collecting pledges for environmental stewardship, and teaching people the basics of urban friendly, worm-based composting. Free worms!
  • Matthew Slaats (artist) will be at Eyebeam signing up participants to join Freespace, an initiative which will be made up of are forgotten spaces, private spaces, lost spaces. People are invited to go out and find and reclaim a space, or donate a space they control in some way for a period of time.
  • Boswyck Farms will be demonstrating hydroponic systems, and introducing their new Mobile Guerrilla Kitchen.
  • Liz Neves (that’s me!) will invite participants to re-establish wilderness in NYC by recreating a lost world where beavers dammed and turtles swam in flowing streams, and foxes frollicked under towering trees.
  • Safari 7 will invite participants to embark on a self-guided tour of urban wildlife along the No. 7 Subway line.  Listen in, grab a map, and go!
  • Jay Weichun (filmmaker/artist) will be onsite from 2-6PM making flower bombs. Using a simple mixture of regional wildflower seeds, soil and clay, flower bombs are a fun way to spread color and life to places of neglect. Participants are invited to make their own flower bombs and form their own flower bombing collectives!

Come out and play on Urban Wilderness Action Day!

The Urban Wilderness Action Center (UWAC) is a project initiated by artist Jon Cohrs, in collaboration with the Eyebeam Student Residents, Eyebeam education coordinator Stephanie Pereira, and UK-based artist Kai-Oi Jay Yung. Please visit Eyebeam’s website for a complete schedule of events in London, Berlin, and Amsterdam:http://eyebeam.org/events/electrosmog-festival-urban-wilderness-action-center

UWAC has been conceived of as part of ElectroSmog, a new, three-day, international festival that will introduce and explore of concept of “Sustainable Immobility”: a critique of current systems of hyper mobility of people and products in travel and transport, and their ecological unsustainability.

a new f’ing wilderness

February 28, 2010

How do you envision urban wilderness? For me, this question brings to mind so many ideas and visions, of what’s wild and alive in the city today, of what was once wild and living in the city hundreds of years ago before the intensive “settling” by Europeans.

I answered this question on the Urban Wilderness Action Center (UWAC) website and will now be taking part in a UWAC Day put on by Eyebeam (et al) on March 20. Want to help out? Email me at: liz [at] raganella [dot] com

Learn more about the event here.

Below is my submission and a hint at how my action will go down:

The preservation, restoration, or natural succession of wild places in the city

24 Feb 2010 by Liz N, No Comments »

Brooklyn NY

What is Urban Wilderness and how do you envision it? : Wilderness is all around us though we’ve paved over much of it. It fights the asphalt, struggling to succeed. Finds its way through crack and crevice, planting itself in abandoned buildings, untended sidewalks and parking lots. Nature thrives in the edge. In the gravel live tiny microbes, under sidewalks in compacted street tree beds, mycorrhizae are at work on the roots of isolated trees.

Most immediately, there are fragmented patches of remnants of wilderness in the parks in which we find refuge from the urban hardscape. On a rare occasion, alone in Prospect Park on a trail in ‘the woods,’ I am no longer in the city, or not the city of 2010.

Wilderness is where we feel an unnameable pull, a call to our heritage, to the billion-year evolution of our inner flora. Where we feel more human and more part of the planet from which we’ve sprung. It can happen while crossing the street, maybe catching the flight of a bird or its song. Or we can try to make it happen, seeking a piece of earth to claim for an afternoon of reflection.

What type of interventions would love to see to help shape Urban Wilderness? We’re interested in both the practical and the fantastically impractical.: Reclaim riparian buffer zones. Take over the paved over. Dig up the pavement and concrete and build urbanite moss gardens in shady alleys and backyards. Plant trees, shrubs, wetland grasses where the pavement was.

Reconnect the urban forest. Have a ’stream’ of trees continuing from Wave Hill down to Central Park, down Park Avenue. A line of trees connecting all of the city’s parks, relinking the mycelial network that allows them to thrive. Migrating birds will find more sanctuary. Maybe we’ll begin to get a sense of the thickness of birds described by early settlers. The air will be a bit cleaner. A newfound sense of calm will fall upon even the most trafficked city neighborhoods.

How would you practically teach and perform such an intervention? (and Would you be interested in leading it?): To start: Hold public demonstrations of what was once present, before it was paved over, using data from the Mannahatta Project. Create giant posters covering the fronts of buildings with recreations of forest stands. Hang flocks of birds from wires between buildings.

Secondarily, convince city planning and officials that street trees should have continuous tree beds extending the length of city blocks. Dig away the sidewalk between trees and plant low-maintenance grasses and plants.

Optimistically, obtain parcels of land and get to replanting forests and riparian buffer zones. I know there would be many willing participants to dig in. There’s just the small matter of procuring the land. Maybe we could start with the 12,000 acres of vacant land in the city first.

I would love to lead this kind of intervention.

This post was submitted by Liz N.

Tags: , , , , ,

Image source: Hoggs Blog

will barter for skills

January 28, 2010

This post is also featured on Greenopolis.

Skillsharing is hot right now. Maybe it’s because most everyone is on a budget or perhaps there’s been a great awakening where people feel compelled to share resources, time, and abilities.

If you’ve never been to a skillshare, here’s the gist: A group of people with various skills come together in the spirit of sharing. The skilled people teach a group of eager learners who either pay a small fee (like $10) to learn new skills or barter with their own skills or services.

Back in October, I attended the Brooklyn Skillshare and learned some great skills which I’ve since applied at home: upcycling glass bottles into vases, drinking glasses (and more) and making butter and ricotta. (You can check out the results here.)

Learning how to cast silver jewelry at the Brooklyn Skillshare.

If you’re interested in trying out one of these skillshares and you live in NYC, you’re in for a treat. From now until February 28 at Grand Opening (139 Norfolk St), you can learn a new skill every night at Trade School – as long as you’re able to give (barter) in return. There are some really cool skills being offered up, including foraging and preserving foods, fabric-making, community engagement, and composting.

Once you’re bitten by the skillsharing bug, it’s hard to quit. In fact, last year, after learning how to make soap, I felt compelled to teach others at a soap-making party. You can read more about my case of soap fever on the Handmade Soap Coach blog.

//

//

permaculture design certification in nyc

November 10, 2009

Learn with the permaculturist who taught me…

Permaculture Design Certification in NYC
with Andrew Faust

March to June 2010
11 weekend sessions 9am to 5pm

Permaculture provides positive solutions for the social and ecological issues of today. Come be inspired by one of the leading visionaries in Permaculture Design and prepare to transform your world!

Enroll Early! Before March 1st $1000. After March 1st $1200.

Information/Registration, email Andrew@HomeBiome.com

Check out the website for more classes www.HomeBiome.com

give synthetics the boot (bag)

October 1, 2009

Icebreaker, maker of some of the finest Merino wool activewear around, will be “bagging synthetics” next week.

Starting Monday, October 5, the New Zealand based company will be taking your stinky old synthetic, petroleum-based t-shirts (think polyester) and turning them into reusable marathon shoe bags in the Paragon Sports store window, on the spot, and for absolutely free.

Bonus for marathoners and aspiring marathoners: get 26.2% off your Icebreaker GT purchase and get a free pair of Icebreaker socks (from Oct 5 to 12).

So why should you ditch your old synthetic tee for a Merino wool one?

Synthetic tees:

  • stink after a run
  • feel unnatural
  • are made from oil

Icebreaker merino apparel:

  • made from all-natural wool from free-range Merino sheep
  • feels soft to the touch
  • has natural wicking abilities
  • doesn’t stink when you sweat in it
  • non-polluting
  • biodegradable
  • suitable for all seasons

Plus you can run in Icebreaker apparel for weeks without washing it, so energy costs are reduced and less detergents are put into the environment. Read more about Icebreaker’s ethos.

And here are the details for the event:

Monday, October 5 to Monday, October 12
11 am – 7 pm
Paragon Sports
867 Broadway at 18th Street, NYC